Xicana Boi
We integrated schools but never integrated the curriculum
Christopher Emdin (via yourpersonalcheerleader)
disminucion:

One Million Farewells, Don Lally

disminucion:

One Million Farewells, Don Lally

I said never apologize for how you feel. No one can control how they feel. The sun doesn’t apologize for being the sun. The rain doesn’t say sorry for falling. Feelings just are.
Iain S. Thomas (via politiciansoc)
bluelightvine:

~Kelis~

bluelightvine:

~Kelis~

textbookxdotcom:

On this day in history In the spring of 1963, activists in Birmingham, Alabama launched one of the most influential campaigns of the Civil Rights Movement: Project C, better known as The Birmingham Campaign.

http://to.pbs.org/1dQ0Auu

bitch-media:

report from the National Transgender Discrimination Survey conducted by the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force and the National Center for Transgender Equality, found that transgender people faced double the rate of unemployment of the general population, with 63 percent of the transgender people surveyed reporting they experienced a serious act of discrimination that majorly affected their ability to sustain themselves. These numbers are even worse for trans people of color, especially trans women of color, the deaths of whom have been deemed a “state of emergency.” 

Trans women have been saddled with the responsibility of taking on trans-exclusionary feminists for far too long—but it’s not their issue to deal with alone. 

Read: It’s Time to End the Long History of Feminism Failing Transgender Women by Tina Vasquez at BitchMedia.org.  Type illustrations by Michelle Leigh

black-krystal-balls:

neoafrican:

Chelo Alonso 

goals

artesany:

Piñatas

artesany:

Piñatas

thinkmexican:

Keeping Traditions Alive at Mexico’s Top Mariachi School

PRI’s The World misses the mark on mariachi, and Mexicans — again!

Escuela de Mariachi Ollin Yoliztli is the first formal mariachi program in Mexico, and its director, Leticia Soto, happens to be a Mexican American from the San Fernando Valley who graduated from UCLA in ’13 with a Ph.D. in ethnomusicology. In fact, she helped revive that school’s campus mariachi, Mariachi de Uclatlán, which celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2013.

Putting Soto’s background in context completely changes the narrative of this story, and most others on mariachi — and Mexican Americans, for that matter. A 50th anniversary is a great accomplishment for a student mariachi program, let alone one based in the United States, but the fact is that Mexicans in the U.S. have long led efforts to formalize the study and elevation of mariachi music’s artistic profile.

The first international conference on mariachi was held not in Guadalajara but in Tucson, Arizona. Several more institutions based around mariachi have been created in the United States in recent years. For instance, Texas and California have impressive mariachi-based school music programs, complete with elaborate state competitions. In contrast, we found no similar school music programs in Mexico.

All of this was, of course, missed by the folks at the BBC and their sister program, PRI’s The World. Instead of focusing on mariachi and its rich history, or on Soto and her unique story, they largely talked about mariachi’s negative stereotypes. But reporter Jason Margolis did mention Soto on his Twitter account. However, he referred to her as “American,” which is clearly a misrepresentation of her heritage. Another reason Mexicans need to tell our own stories. Tan-tan!

Related: Sebastien de la Cruz: The Face of the Future and San Antonio Says ‘In Your Face, Racists!’

Read more stories on Mariachi

malverdemarket:

El Futuro

malverdemarket:

El Futuro